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Old 11-05-2007, 06:14 PM
BRANDON BOND's Avatar
BRANDON BOND BRANDON BOND is offline
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Join Date: Apr 2005
Location: Atlanta GA
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Q...) What happened to your retirement?

A)... HA! Well, I stopped tattooing at conventions, and stopped tattooing at All or Nothing, so technically I am done publicly tattooing forever. BUT, I run three businesses and work with another company in Boston full time, I still tattoo at the private studio ( www.antiartelite.com www.antiartatlanta.com ), I manage all my own folks, I answer all my stupid emails personally still (which is starting to kill me by itself), so technically I did retire... sorta.

The truth is its hard to stop a compulsion and for me workaholism is an unfortunate compulsive addiction at this point, I mentioned that several times in my book "WHORE" ( www.strangleholdmerch.com) It is both my success and my downfall at the same time. I am saving money and have been for 15 years.... I'm almost done.

Q...) What in your mind qualifies you as "BEING DONE"? And once you get to the DONE spot, do you think you'll really be able to do nothing?

A...) It is a financial figure that signifies being done for sure, and I am almost there. I feel like I don't have anything to prove anymore, I don't think that anyone will ever question my studios ability to do a bad ass tattoo, I've won awards, had lots of sex, partied a lot, toured, worked with some of the most amazing artists in history, tattooed some of the coolest people in the world, and worked my ass off from being a worthless, destitute, punk kid all the way up to being a 7 figure sole proprietor of several highly successful businesses. Say what you want, but we made this sh*t look easy, and it wasn't at all. A lot of people will say that's cocky or arrogant, but its not at all!!! Its the truth, and we worked extremely hard to get where we are, nobody handed us anything.

As to being able to eventually shut it off, yes I believe that I can do that easily and am working towards that everyday. I will always tattoo, it's who I am, but I would much rather just do it for fun on my friends every now and then, and NOT answer my phone 24 hours a day!

Q...) This year you released an instructional seminar DVD to widespread acclaim. Why?

A...) I was touring for two years doing live seminars and it was like a comedian telling the same jokes every night. It was also difficult because there way no way to show, in a live setting, up close tattooing and explain it the way we could with the medium of video. This 2 hour+ film is in NO WAY meant to REPLACE an apprenticeship!!! All aspects of sterilization and cross contamination must be covered prior to viewing this DVD. It is available to licenced professionals only and in all honesty its for the more advanced artists of the world, people who are already doing solid work consistently and want to take it to the higher level, those looking to get booked heavily 6 months in advance doing only the tattoos they want to do. Its about career development AND actual tattooing. It covers everything about stencil layout, illustration vs realism, tattooing, time management, focus, promotion, running a crew, attracting great artists to your shop, dealing with the customers, convention booth acquisition, awards, interviews, articles, and career growth. Its incredibly fast paced and detailed and we have received nothing from artists who watched it but gratitude. I've seen a lot of the new tattoos done after artists view the film and its amazing to see the growth and art explosions that our artists at ALL OR NOTHING seem to always experience IN OTHER STUDIOS and from artists we've never even met in person!

Q...) Where can one view some previews or purchase the seminar DVD?
www.strangleholdmerch.com sells all our stuff, and our previews are on there and on youtube at http://youtube.com/watch?v=h5jPWdJWtZ0

Q...) Will there ever be any personalized "Brandon Bond" tattoo equipment for sale?

A...) Yes, there are several new projects in the works, a new awesome tattoo machine made by myself and www.dankbuilt.com, two separate color palette of inks both traditionally made and the new more easily removable style, clothing of course, the sky is the limit and we are involved in producing a lot already.

Q...) Speaking of ink, there is a new ink being released called Freedom2 "Infinite Ink" that is easier to remove. www.freedom2ink.com Do you see a future in those inks and have you heard of them or even worked with them before?

A...) Actually I have been working with that company as a consultant for almost a year, and I have personally tattooed with that ink more than anyone in the world. I work with them at least 3-5 days a week every week. I have tattooed with every single version of the black ink, and will be developing a color palette with them and the geniuses at Brown University this winter. I was the first tattoo artist to work with them so closely and I am a part of their family for sure.

LOTS of tattooers initially were claiming things in the media like "tattoos are sacred, they should be permanent" well I COMPLETELY agree BUT ALL TATTOOS are REMOVABLE, this particular version of tattoo ink just comes out with less trauma, expense and scarring. and the new ink IS PERMANENT!!!!! I think there was a lot of initial skepticism and chaos surrounding Freedom 2 and the idea of an easily removable ink, but like all innovations, that will subside when everyone sees that its the same thing only better.

It is the next evolutionary step in our industry, change leads to growth and tattooing fears change more so than any other industry in the world it seems. It is our traditions and self governing rules that have made us what we are as artists, and I have nothing but respect for all of those who have come before me. Artists like Sailor Jerry, Don Ed Hardy, Mike Malone, Paul Rogers, and one of my own former staff members, Zeke Owen, were all innovators and introduced new concepts and advances in our industry, we should not forget that it is innovations and new ideas that led us to where we are today and will lead us to where we are going to be tomorrow.

The truth is I have endured hundreds of hours of horrible laser sessions, and so has my wife. I got tattooed heavily at a young age, long before I knew what to look for in an artist and a studio, long before the Internet, and the ability to see so many great artists. I DO NOT regret getting tattooed at all - but what I'm saying is... If I could go back magically and get tattoos that are the quality of the artists at ALL OR NOTHING for example, I would do it in a heartbeat. I love my tattoos and I love my bodysuit, but I also love ART and the artwork available today was not available to ANYONE 20 years ago.

I have a upper half sleeve, that was tattooed completely, lasered heavily, lasered some more, experimented with propane and scalpels, home removal techniques, and four different kinds of laser. I then got the scarred area re-tattooed by Eric Merrill, and when the skin didn't accept the ink, we did it again. I have spent over $15, 000.00 on that one section of my body and been through far more suffering than any reasonable person should have to go through. And it still doesn't look right. It's because the ink that was used was SO incredibly hard to remove. Many artists and clients have experienced similar stories, and sometimes the scars are so bad that you cannot RE-TATTOO over it successfully. IF WE CAN AVOID THIS WE SHOULD! Many of the best artists in the world have been through extensive laser, Guy Aitchinson jumps to mind for example. Yes tattoos should be permanent and stand the test of time, but once a client pays for that artwork it becomes THEIRS not OURS as artists, clients can do whatever they want with their own bodies.

To shun freedom 2 is absurd, its like "ohhh we should outlaw COVER UP TATTOOS, cause they should just be STUCK with whatever we do forever" or "we should not listen to what a client even wants to get tattooed". It's crazy. Its their bodies they can do whatever they want and not all artists are equal, lets be honest! I'm guessing about 15% of tattoo shops in the world are amazingly talented and that do award winning, super stylized, highly sought after art. That leaves 85% of either average or below average artists.

Getting tattooed is a journey, and an educational experience for the client. Not all clients are smart enough to start our with a sleeve from a Paul Booth or a Sean Herman. When I got my first tattoo, I thought "if I pick the right one, it will look awesome!" I was wrong, it looked like s&!t. I got tattooed by the guy who gave me the cheapest price and I got a piece of flash that came out all wrong. Hell, I dint even know what FLASH was - I had no concept of a custom piece of art, I had no idea who my artist was or what a portfolios importance was, I didn't even look at it.

I removed the tattoo years later and got on a plane to go get a custom piece from an artist like 8 states away. WHY? Because by then I had learned about what I was getting myself into. Clients aren't born with the innate knowledge it requires to find an artist like Bob Tyrrell nor is a client born with the motivation to travel across the country to get top quality work. Some are maybe, but in my experience VERY FEW are. So if we can give the world an opportunity to remove sub par artwork and replace it with better art at a later date, or remove something that is a painful reminder of a painful time in life or whatever, I say THAT'S WHAT WE SHOULD DO!

My wife is so badly scarred from laser treatments that the tissue is not even tattooable anymore. She got tattooed as a young lady, way before her and I met, now she sees great art everyday and wants that instead of her crappy flash dolphins. It's tragic that even being married to an artist like me, she is still limited in what she can do with her old tattoos.

I believe that this ink will also open our industry to an entirely new demographic, which means more families sustaining off of our art. People who are already heavily tattooed but are not sure about going past the elbow or getting their hands tattooed, or other visible spots. People who want to try out the tattoo world but don't want to have to sit through 13 laser sessions to undo it if their artist is inconsistent or sub par. The "fence sitters" of the universe are about to hop right off that fence and into your chair as an artist. More clients, more art, more money, more pushing the limits of what can be done with our art form. Say what you will, but the minute you charge one dollar for a piece of art it becomes a business, a transaction, a livelihood, an income. The only way to avoid that would be to do tattoos for free everyday forever, and I don't know any artists like that. There will be many more technological, and artistic "jumps" in our lifetime in tattooing, I say if its good for clients, and its good for artists, lets get it on.

Our studio will be one of 10 studios selected nationwide to offer the ink. I chose the studios that will use it initially in order to control the quality of the artwork that is a result. I enlisted the assistance of artists, Bob Tyrrell, Damon Conklin, Tony Ciavarro, Chris Blinston, Poalo, Scott Campbell, Larry Brogan, Shane Oneal, Johnny Jackson, and several other artists who are not only my friends, but guys I respect artistically. All or Nothing Tattoo will be the first exclusive outlet and the only one in Georgia for the next year. Tattoo Supergenuis in Seattle, Tattoo City in Lockport IL, Divinity Tattoo in AZ, Big Brain 2 in FL, Texas Body Arts in TX, and a handful of other will be the only studios offering this ink initially. They are all incredible studios.

Q...) How many times have you not gotten paid for a tattoo, because you decided you could put bl*wjobs in the bank?

A...) (laughter) I have had my share of fun times as a youngster for sure. But in the immortal words of Tupac M.O.B (money over b*tches!)

Q...) And, of course, what was the dumbest most f@#ked-up thing that happened while you were learning to tattoo? Like, the moment when you first thought "s&!t this job sucks"

A...) The first time I saw an empty body bag, chains, a cinder block and a chainsaw in my boss's trunk as a youngster in Texas.

Q...) Out of your many accomplishments, which one are you the most proud of?

A...) That's a great question with an easy answer. I would have to say professionally, the studio itself - ALL OR NOTHING and everyone involved I'm proud of all of us, when I opened that store, I didn't even know if we would last a month ya know? we lasted..... (laughter) I'm proud of my artists - those that are here now and those that have moved on, to see the growth, security, financial stability, new families, new babies and career achievement makes it all worthwhile. Their success validates my efforts just knowing that I had something to do with that.

In a personal kind of accomplishment kinda way, the dog rescue stuff - placing a dog in a safe and loving home saving him/her from euthanasia is the coolest thing ever. I have been fortunate enough to assist in the placement of over 200 animals (mostly rescued abused pit bulls as they are my favorite) and that is the "awesomest" thing ever.

Q...) Thanks for this interview, you surprised me with a lot of your answers, best of luck to you and your empire in the southeast and beyond.

A...) Thank you! I appreciate all your time.
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Brandon Bond is one of the most successful, published, and award winning tattoo artists in the world. He is the owner of the thriving All or Nothing Tattoo empire in Atlanta, Georgia. He also owns a publishing company called Stranglehold which sells movies, books, clothing, artwork, and other tattoo related products. After 15 years of compulsive workaholism, Brandon still tattoos constantly, staying booked about a year in advance. Last year Brandon opened a second studio Anti Art Elite. Located northwest of Atlanta, GA, this studio hosts two movie theaters with thousands of titles to choose from, two koi fish ponds, and two gallery spaces featuring the private "Brandon Bond Collection" of art from the world's top tattooists.


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1: Basic info: please give me the Shop name, Address, phone number, Web
site, hours open, walkins or appointments only?

Brandon Bond

CEO/ALL OR NOTHING INC.

CEO/A.N.T.I. Art Elite

CEO/Stranglehold Publishing

2569 South Cobb Dr. Suite A

Smyrna, GA 30080

(770) 435-9966

www.allornothingtattoo.com
www.strangleholdmerch.com
www.atlantatattootv.com
www.tattooingatlanta.com
www.antiartelite.com
www.antiartatlanta.com
www.brandonbond.com
www.brandonMFbond.com
www.myspace.com/brandonbond

I own 2 studios and a Publishing Company, one studio is public, and does both appointments and walk ins, and is called ALL OR NOTHING TATTOO. I also own an oppulent and luxurious private studio called A.N.T.I. Art Elite that is exclusively by appointment only and booked about a year in advance.


2: How'd you get interested in tattoos? How did you decide to make
tattooing your job?


I was an artist as a child, and as far back as I can remeber I loved tattoos, I wanted tattoos and I was fascinated by the whole process, the lifestyle, the artwork, the application and it looked like a fun way to make a living, it turned out to be a lot more than I had hoped for... its amazing, and it has become who I am.


3: How did you learn to tattoo? I apprenticed 15 years ago, at Tattoo Zoo in Ft Walton Beach, Florida under Jim Wolfe, he gave me my first tattoo machine, which I still have to this day. I am forever grateful to him and his family for changing my path forever.

4: What type of work is most popular with your customers right now?
What's popular with you -- what are you really into doing? Do you have
a specialty that you're best known for?

My clients are generally very serious collectors, who fly in to get tattooed. 80% of my clients travel from afar. We provide shuttle service from Atlanta's international airport, hotel reservations, and transportation to and from the hotels to my private studio, and then back to the airport. My work is generally based in realism, but is not realism at all. I have been working to push the realism/expressive illustrative aspects of my compositions for a few years now, I tend to create imagery from a photo, and embellish and change the actual feel, layout and mood of the original imagery into something entirely different. Most of my clients at this point in my carreer let me do whatever I want on them, within reason. So, I keep a stockpile of images, drawings, and concepualized ideas that are ready to go, and when a cleint arrives at www.antiartelite.com we go through the piles of imagery to see what best suits the body part.

5: What do you visualize before developing a tattoo?

The flow on the body and the ability to determine what the image is from afar is key. I work with a body part and go crazy with it. Bold easilly readable imagery that will stand the test of time and blind small children from across a parking lot is what I'm after.

6: Any new techniques you're researching/exploring/just starting to work with?

Actually yes there are several new inks and machines that I have been working with, the predominant one is a company called Freedom 2, "Infinate Ink", A permanent and medical grade, safe ink, that is simply more easilly removable with only one laser treatment than contemporary inks on the market today. This Ink has been the source of great contraversy throughout the tattoo industry. There are many misconceptions, for example it is NOT SEMI- PERMANANT! It is permanent tattoo ink that simply comes out easier and less expensively or painfully.

I have been working with that company as a consultant for almost a year, and I have personally tattooed with that ink more than anyone in the world. I have tattooed with every single version of the black ink, and will be developing a color palette with them and the geniuses at Brown and Duke Universities this winter. I was the first tattoo artist to work with them so closely and I am a part of their family for sure.

LOTS of tattooers initially were claiming things in the media like "tattoos are sacred, they should be permanent" well I COMPLETELY agree BUT ALL TATTOOS are REMOVABLE, this particular version of tattoo ink just comes out with less trauma, expense and scarring. and the new ink IS PERMANENT!!!!! I think there was a lot of initial skepticism and chaos surrounding Freedom 2 and the idea of an easily removable ink, but like all innovations, that will subside when everyone sees that its the same thing only better.

It is the next evolutionary step in our industry, change leads to growth and tattooing fears change more so than any other industry in the world. It is our traditions and self governing rules that have made us what we are as artists, and I have nothing but respect for all of those who have come before me. Artists like Sailor Jerry, Don Ed Hardy, Mike Malone, Paul Rogers, and one of my own former staff members, Zeke Owen, were all innovators and introduced new concepts and advances in our industry, we should not forget that it is innovations and new ideas that led us to where we are today and will lead us to where we are going to be tomorrow.

The truth is I have endured hundreds of hours of horrible laser sessions, and so has my wife. I got tattooed heavily at a young age, long before I knew what to look for in an artist and a studio, long before the Internet, and the ability to see so many great artists. I DO NOT regret getting tattooed at all - but what I'm saying is... If I could go back magically and get tattoos that are the quality of the artists at ALL OR NOTHING for example, I would do it in a heartbeat. I love my tattoos and I love my bodysuit, but I also love ART and the artwork available today was not available to ANYONE 20 years ago.

I have a upper half sleeve, that was tattooed completely, lasered heavily, lasered some more, experimented with propane and scalpels, home removal techniques, and four different kinds of laser. I then got the scarred area re-tattooed, and when the skin didn't accept the ink, we did it again. I have spent over $15, 000.00 on that one section of my body and been through far more suffering than any reasonable person should have to go through. And it still doesn't look right. It's because the ink that was used was SO incredibly complicated to remove. Many artists and clients have experienced similar stories, and sometimes the scars are so bad that you cannot RE-TATTOO over it successfully. IF WE CAN AVOID THIS WE SHOULD! Many of the best artists in the world have been through extensive laser, Guy Aitchinson jumps to mind for example. Yes, tattoos should be permanent and stand the test of time, but once a client pays for that artwork it becomes THEIRS not OURS as artists, clients can do whatever they want with their own bodies.

To shun freedom 2 is absurd, its like "ohhh we should outlaw COVER UP TATTOOS, cause they should just be STUCK with whatever we do forever" or "we should not listen to what a client even wants to get tattooed". It's crazy. Its their bodies they can do whatever they want and not all artists are equal, lets be honest! I'm guessing about 15% of tattoo shops in the world are amazingly talented and that do award winning, super stylized, highly sought after art. That leaves 85% of either average or below average artists. This number is changing quickly and there are more and more amazing shops popping up everywhere thank god, but we still have a long way to go.

Getting tattooed is a journey, and an educational experience for the client. Not all clients are smart enough to start our with a sleeve from a Paul Booth or a Sean Herman. When I got my first tattoo, I thought "if I pick the right one, it will look awesome!" I was wrong, it looked like s&!t. I got tattooed by the guy who gave me the cheapest price and I got a piece of flash that came out all wrong. Hell, I dint even know what FLASH was - I had no concept of a custom piece of art, I had no idea who my artist was or what a portfolios importance was, I didn't even look at it.

I removed the tattoo years later and got on a plane to go get a custom piece from an artist like 8 states away. WHY? Because by then I had learned about what I was getting myself into. Clients aren't born with the innate knowledge it requires to find an artist like Bob Tyrrell nor is a client born with the motivation to travel across the country to get top quality work. Some are, but in my experience its a small number of clients. So if we can give the world an opportunity to remove sub par artwork and replace it with better art at a later date, or remove something that is a painful reminder of a painful time in life or whatever, I say THAT'S WHAT WE SHOULD DO!

Hell, I OWN one of the best tattoo studios in the world, ALL OR NOTHING, where I could get tattooed all day every day for FREE by the most award winning crew in history, and even I am limited on what I can do with my body suit because I got so heavilly tattooed at a young age, and now Im stuck with this crazy hard to remove biomechtribal crap! My cleints get waaaaay better tattoos than I have and that sucks! Im jealous everytime someone leaves with a fresh piece of art. When I started tattooing 15 years ago, there was NO art like what we are seeing today, the artform has exploded! And I want some of THAT!!

Say what you will, but the minute you charge one dollar for a piece of art it becomes a business, a transaction, a livelihood, an income. The only way to avoid that would be to do tattoos for free everyday forever, and I don't know any artists like that. There will be many more technological, and artistic "jumps" in our lifetime in tattooing, I say if its good for clients, and its good for artists, lets get it on.



7:This year you released an instructional seminar DVD. Why, and what does it cover?

I was touring for two years doing live tattoo seminars at conventions, and it was like a comedian telling the same jokes every night. It was also difficult because there way no way to show, in a live setting, up close tattooing and explain it the way we could with the medium of video. This 2 hour+ film is in NO WAY meant to REPLACE an apprenticeship!!! All aspects of sterilization and cross contamination must be covered prior to viewing this DVD. It is available to licenced professionals only and in all honesty its for the more advanced artists of the world, people who are already doing solid work consistently and want to take it to the higher level, those looking to get booked heavily 6 months in advance doing only the tattoos they want to do.

Its about career development AND actual tattooing. It covers everything about stencil layout, illustration vs realism, tattooing, time management, focus, promotion, running a crew, attracting great artists to your shop, dealing with the customers, convention booth acquisition, awards, interviews, articles, and career growth. Its incredibly fast paced and detailed and we have received nothing from artists who watched it but gratitude. I've seen a lot of the new tattoos done after artists view the film and its amazing to see the growth and art explosions that our artists at ALL OR NOTHING seem to always experience IN OTHER STUDIOS and from artists we've never even met in person!

7.5) Your publishing company also released a tattoo documentary entitled "See you In Hell". Where can we buy it and why on earth did you name it that?

Because Im a Star Wars Nerd!!! The movie is about our family, artists, friends, clients, helpers, ole ladies, dogs, babies, you know, OUR family. In Empire Strikes Back, at the beginning, Luke is missing. Everyone seems to accept this except Han Solo, and when they tell Captain Solo not to go out into the freezing cold weather because his "ton-ton" will freeze before he reaches the first marker -- he replies, "Well, I'll see you in hell" and goes into the blizzard to save his friend. I felt as though that statement sums up my feelings for our family at All or Nothing Tattoo. And in risking his own life he saves Luke and kills his ton-ton. There is nothing I wouldn't do to help one of my own. That's one of the central principals of the film. And since my favorite movie (The Devil's Rejects) was based on my second favorite movie (Empire Strikes Back), it only made sense for there to be references to both in my first movie. Its on sale at www.strangleholdmerch.com

8:: describe your shop -- its location, its appearance and atmosphere.

well theres one public studio and one private studio.

The public studio is All or Nothing Tattoo and we have been extremely fortunate to have put together an amazing list of talent. The artists who have tattooed at All or Nothing are a veritable "who's who" list of today's most innovative and contemporary artists. Dave Tedder, Sean Herman, Chris Vennekamp, Nate Beavers, Joshua Carlton, Mike Devries, Josh Woods, Mike Demasi, Jeff Paetzold, Eric Merrill, Dan Henk, Tim Victim, Tim Orth, Justin Weatherholtz, Joe Waulken, Albie Rock, Bryan Reynolds, Jason Ackerman, Anthony Orsatti, Ted Wallen, Lenny Renken, Pierre Monteleone, Zeke Owen, Nathan Kostechko, and slews of others have tattooed at the Atlanta studio. We offer body piercing from master piercer Max Brand who is also our staff photographer, and the photographer for PRICK magazine here in Atlanta.

The private studio is a gallery that hosts two movie theaters, two koi fish ponds stocked with hundreds of rare fish and turtles, two art gallery spaces featuring the private "Brandon Bond Collection" of art from the world's top tattooists. We also have wireless video games in every room, a luxurious Jacuzzi (for the artists) complete with surround sound and wireless gaming, decorative hand laid Brazilian flooring, sand blasted and etched glass, 9 Foot tall handcarved statues that weigh TONS, and every amenity imaginable.


Why the urge to open A.N.T.I. Art Elite and spend all that money for a studio that doesn't even allow walkins? It doesnt seem very cost effective!


I needed a private space to tattoo and focus on art -- business had consumed my life completely, so I needed a place for my artists and I to focus strictly on artwork all day without interruption -- and it is amazing! The work is better, not to mention the waterfalls, movie theaters, etched glass, and total freedom! No restrictions! No distractions! No stupid questions interrupting me, no phone calls, nothing but me and a client in an adult Disney Land.

How did you choose the shop names All or Nothing and A.N.T.I. Art Elite?

All or Nothing was easy to name becaus ethat exactly what it was going to be - its how we live, its how we work its how we play, its how we tour, its how we exist... in absolutes.

A.N.T.I. Art Elite was kind of a joke, playing on the stuck up tattoo artists of the world, the elite that are too good to kick it with us hard workin' tattoo type folks, but A.N.T.I. is All or Nothing Tattoo Inc.

Why did you select Atlanta?

Because of the airport, you can get a direct flight here from anywhere, and I knew that would be a serious issue as I was already dealing with a lot of out of state folks.

10: Whose work do you admire.

Dave Tedder, Sean Herman, Chris Vennkamp, Jeff Paetzold, Bob Tyrrell, Albie Rock, Josh Woods, Tim Orth, Bryan Reynolds, Paul Booth, Nikko, and Joe Waulken.

11: What do you do for fun? (assuming you actually have any free time),

I love to shoot guns! I get a lot of sh*t for the whole interest in guns from some folks, so here's the deal: I was born into a wonderful family and there I was taught that the protection of that family is my job as a loving participant. I learned to shoot guns before I even knew what a cuss word was. I was taught safety, respect, and regard for human life, I learned that a gun is as safe as its owner is, and I am extremely careful with my firearms.

I love shooting, my father loves shooting, my wife loves it and a lot of our staff and clients love it. I have very little free time, and what free time I have I like to spend with close friends and quality firearms. It's a hobby, like quilting. It has NOTHING whatsoever to do with my job, or the four businesses I own.

I am trained in tactical shooting, entry, sub-gun, long-gun, shotgun and handgun courses by our local SWAT team, as well as having shot piles of law enforcement guns at law enforcement targets with the guidance of law enforcement officers. I have had extensive military training with a Lt. Colonel involved in special forces focusing on disarming people and using their weapons against them, and Dave Tedder and I have been training off and on for over a year with a DEA firearms teacher (with an incredibly STRICT curriculum). It's what we love to do, that's all.


****If you could tattoo anyone in the world, living or dead, who would it be and what would you tattoo on them?

BB:
I would tattoo a picture of Tupac on Jesus Christ. With an AK under it that says M.O.B . (money over b*tches) -- or I would tattoo Satan with "La Vida Loca."

******Do you ever sleep?
BB:
Yes, but not nearly enough. Even my staff has no idea what goes on at the office everyday, and there's no way they could -- Web guys see the Web stuff, artists see the clients, Stranglehold folks see the Stranglehold orders, printers see the printing, the graphics department sees the graphics, but I am the only person that sees ALL of it. I'm not complaining a bit -- that's the job I signed on for when I created this chaotic circus. Haters can say whatever they want, but no one has EVER called me lazy.

***********Out of your many accomplishments, which one are you the most proud of?

BB - That's a great question with an easy answer. I would have to say professionally, the studio itself - ALL OR NOTHING and everyone involved I'm proud of all of us, when I opened that store, I didn't even know if we would last a month ya know? we lasted..... (laughter) I'm proud of my artists - those that are here now and those that have moved on, to see the growth, security, financial stability, new families, new babies and career achievement makes it all worthwhile. Their success validates my efforts just knowing that I had something to do with that.

In a personal kind of accomplishment kinda way, the dog rescue stuff that we do everyday!!!- placing a dog in a safe and loving home saving him/her from euthanasia is the coolest thing ever. I have been fortunate enough to assist in the placement of over 200 animals (mostly rescued abused pit bulls as they are my favorite) and that is the "awesomest" thing ever.


******You are promoting some companies that sell tattoo equipment and aftercare products like Hardnox clothing and H2Ocean. Is this part of the businessman that you are, or from your experience have thought that these companies have some good stuff to offer?

BB: We were one of the first tattoo shops to actually be publicly sponsored, and I think its a great idea. I would never endorse a product that is not awesome! We are approached by companies daily and I am only sponsored by five companies; therefore, we are extremely selective -- only the best --'todo o nada' style ya know! I endorse Hardnox clothes because I wear them everyday and they get you sex. I endorse H2Ocean aftercare because it works incredibly well. Sponsorship... It's the future for sure. Tattoo art is so ingrained in our society now, our art is everywhere, ads, tv, fast food menus, cigarrettes, car companies, snowboards, skateboards, clothing, it would only make since that the innovative and recognizable artists should be endorsing what he/she believes to be the best.

*************When I see someone like you generating so much energy towards their business and personal career, I wonder how in the hell they can manage it. How do you do it?

BB: I'm barely pulling it off, and I'm exhausted and almost dead. For real -- be careful what you wish for!

*****Your online retail store, www.strangleholdmerch.com seems to be flourishing, whats going on with that buisness?

We are doing extremely well, even exceeding my own expectations. This december we are having a huge Holiday Sale, where everything is half price... even the seminar dvd. Childrens coloring books, Art sketchbooks, movies, clothing, everything. I love Christmas!!!! So naturally we had to do something special.

********What's the best way to describe your new book Whore, and why was it something that you wanted to put together?

I was approached about doing a book two years ago. A company asked me to send them some drawings and photos, and then they would do the rest. I blew them off, knowing that anything I put together would have to be completely controlled by my graphics team and uncensored. Their offer inspired me and I began a journey to create something extremely personal, powerful, motivating, and artistic. It took us two years of working everyday on it. Every page is a piece of art, an uncomfortable window into an extremely disturbing and blunt reality. I address every aspect of tattooing, sexuality, relationships, promotion, exposure, motivation, money, frustration, being a boss, hatred, love, despair, and success. I touched on every subject that we could force into the 170 plus pages. There is text, photos, drawings, blood splatter, firearms, nudity, money, short stories, and deeply personal messages exploding throughout the book. It's pretty insane and every word is completely honest in every way. In fact, it's too honest at times.


******************When a client comes to you and says, "Do whatever you want," how do you decide what to tattoo on them?

I'm extremely fortunate to have the clients I do. Most of them pick a body part and say, "Fill it up." This freedom allows for an incredible level of consistent experimentation and motivation. I keep a heavy black file folder with me at all times that contains hundreds of sketches, photos, images, disks, and tattoo ideas. I work to overflow this folder constantly. On the day of a client's appointment, I just lay out a few printouts and drawings that fit the body part, and explain what direction I'm pushing towards. From this the client selects the style or imagery he or she is most enthusiastic about. I stay up late into the night regularly, researching, drawing, screwing around with Photoshop, and printing all types of images that intimidate my artistic confidence. I look to do tattoos that are extremely hard to do. Clients really dig going through all the secret files, and sometimes they argue over who gets what, but nothing is wasted. I discuss a lot of this process and how to emulate it in my seminar DVD.


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Jean-Francois Laverdiere: What do you visualize before developing a tattoo?
Brandon Bond: The flow on the body and the ability to determine what the image is from afar is key. I work with a body part and go crazy with it.
JFL:
If you could tattoo anyone in the world, living or dead, who would it be and what would you tattoo on them?
BB:
I would tattoo a picture of Tupac on Jesus Christ. With an AK under it that says M.O.B. (money over b*tches) -- or I would tattoo Satan with "La Vida Loca."
JFL:
Do you ever sleep?
BB:
Yes, but not nearly enough. Even my staff has no idea what goes on at the office everyday, and there's no way they could -- Web guys see the Web stuff, artists see the clients, Stranglehold folks see the Stranglehold orders, printers see the printing, the graphics department sees the graphics, but I am the only person that sees ALL of it. I'm not complaining a bit -- that's the job I signed on for when I created this chaotic circus. Haters can say whatever they want, but no one has EVER called me lazy.




JFL:
What is up with your obsession with guns?
BB:
I get a lot of sh*t for the whole interest in guns from some folks, so here's the deal: I was born into a wonderful family and there I was taught that the protection of that family is my job as a loving participant. I learned to shoot guns before I even knew what a cuss word was. I was taught safety, respect, and regard for human life, I learned that a gun is as safe as its owner is, and I am extremely careful with my firearms.

I love shooting, my father loves shooting, my wife loves it and a lot of our staff and clients love it. I have very little free time, and what free time I have I like to spend with close friends and quality firearms. It's a hobby, like quilting. It has NOTHING whatsoever to do with my job, or the four businesses I own.

I am trained in tactical shooting, entry, sub-gun, long-gun, shotgun and handgun courses by our local SWAT team, as well as having shot piles of law enforcement guns at law enforcement targets with the guidance of law enforcement officers. I have had extensive military training with a Lt. Colonel involved in special forces focusing on disarming people and using their weapons against them, and Dave Tedder and I have been training off and on for over a year with a DEA firearms teacher (with an incredibly STRICT curriculum). It's what we love to do, that's all.

JFL:
How did you get to be as good as you are and who was your teacher?
BB:
I had many teachers -- in the sense that I looked at tattoo magazines and lived in tattoo shops - but no one ever really sat me down and showed me much of anything after my "apprenticeship." I started tattooing at a small shop in Ft. Walton Beach, Florida that is still there called Tattoo Zoo.

I think I achieved the level of success that I have based on hard work-tattooing constantly, never giving in, and focusing on nothing else, for over a decade. Perseverance, and constant throbbing. I tried everything, every machine I could, every ink, and when I was asleep, I was still dreaming about tattooing.

I focused on it so much that I started to resent tattooing, believe it or not. The business side of our empire is constantly attempting to take me out of tattooing, and have me focus all my energy on paperwork,
advertisement, Websites, etc.

It became second nature, but at the same time reminded me of the life I was missing around me. I did nothing but tattoo-related activities for year after year, worked seven days a week, and moved city-to-city based solely on trying to be closer to better artists. I worked in 50 shops! If I couldn't figure out how to do a decent tattoo after all that, I figured I'd just go back to being a musician.
JFL:
Who was Brandon Bond before he was the tattoo artist?
BB:
I was a musician. I played guitar, keyboards, pianos, drums, and bass, anything that made noise. Tattooing was an easier way to make money so, honestly, it was my second choice and I have always regretted that decision in a way.
JFL:
When you started All or Nothing Tattoo, it was just you and a couple of other artists. Today you have eleven tattoo artists and a piercer. Why you think all this grew so fast?
BB:
Actually, we have a staff of over seventy people including Web guys, graphics guys etc. It grew as fast as it did because we are a family and we take care of each other. We are successful and that only attracts more successful and awesome people -- my crew is my life and I love every single f@#king one of them.
JFL:
All the artists in your shop have a particular style and an excellent quality. How did you manage to form this team and how you do find the balance among so many styles and personalities in one place?
BB:
They always come to us because we are known for doing great art and taking great care of our artists! It's like tattoo Valhalla here: created by artists for artists. I have never solicited a single staff member –- there is actually a waiting list.
JFL:
Then, a year ago, you had the need to create A.N.T.I. Art Elite. Why the urge to open another space?
BB:
I needed a private space to tattoo and focus on art -- business had consumed my life completely, so I needed a place for my artists and I to focus strictly on artwork all day without interruption -- and it is amazing! The work is better, not to mention the waterfalls, movie theaters, etched glass, and total freedom! No restrictions! No distractions!
JFL:
You are promoting some companies that sell tattoo equipment and aftercare products like Hardnox clothing and H2Ocean. Is this part of the businessman that you are, or from your experience have thought that these companies have some good stuff to offer?
BB:
We were one of the first tattoo shops to actually be publicly sponsored, and I think its a great idea. I would never endorse a product that is not awesome! We are approached by companies daily and I am only sponsored by five companies; therefore, we are extremely selective -- only the best --'todo o nada' style ya know! I endorse Hardnox clothes because I wear them everyday and they get you sex. I endorse H2Ocean aftercare because it works incredibly well. I endorse Kingpin Tattoo Supply because they have great stuff and only sell to licensed tattoo artists.
JFL:
I've also noticed that you tend to do more to promote the artists who work for you than most folks. How much of that do you leave up to them and how much of it is part of the over promotional set up for the business?
BB:
I stay on everybody all the time to constantly push forward. I spend hundreds of hours working with each artist and their sites and their ads and their galleries, get their stuff uploaded for them all over, and make sure they are sending art to magazines because I want them to be successful and happy and awesome.
JFL:
When I see someone like you generating so much energy towards their business and personal career, I wonder how in the hell they can manage it. How do you do it?
BB:
I'm barely pulling it off, and I'm exhausted and almost dead. For real -- be careful what you wish for!
JFL:
Why did you name the documentary See You in H*LL?
BB:
Because the movie is about our family, artists, friends, clients, helpers, ole ladies, dogs, babies, you know, OUR family. In Empire Strikes Back, at the beginning, Luke is missing. Everyone seems to accept this except Han Solo, and when they tell Captain Solo not to go out into the freezing cold weather because his "ton-ton" will freeze before he reaches the first marker -- he replies, "Well, I'll see you in hell" and goes into the blizzard to save his friend. I felt as though that statement sums up my feelings for our family at All or Nothing Tattoo. And in risking his own life he saves Luke and kills his ton-ton. There is nothing I wouldn't do to help one of my own. That's one of the central principals of the film. And since my favorite movie ( The Devil's Rejects) was based on my second favorite movie (Empire Strikes Back), it only made sense for there to be references to both in my first movie.
JFL:
In your film, it seems as though your wife is an exact opposite of you. What does she think of your crazy interests and your work as a tattoo artist?
BB:
My wife knows nothing of my career, and is still not tattooed by me at all. She sees a different side of me than anyone else, and I think probably appreciates that. She does, however, tolerate my excessive workaholism, and understands that there are times when I have to disappear into a world of late night screaming and pirate ship captain-like behavior... she stays away from me when I'm in "work mode," which is probably smart. As to my interest with the gun stuff and all -- she loves shooting and loves animals and pit bulls, so we share those interests and it brings us closer together. We are planning to open a non-profit pit bull rescue shelter together in the next three years.

JFL:
How does one reform oneself from a badly motivated, slut tattooist into a capable, competent tattoo artist? What changed? What kind of sacrifices does that entail?
BB:
I came to a point where it was time to sh*t or get off the pot, ya know? I could have sustained forever being that guy, but it was an empty, unfulfilling and low-income type gig, with no retirement. It was a dead end. I had a blast touring and doing guest spots and drunken conventions, but I could never hold a job for more than a year or so. I cleared my head, maintained total sobriety for a period of two years, and gave it everything I had in every way. Hence the studio name -- it was either going to work or not, but it wasn't going to fail based on a lack of effort. It was risky and it was all the money I had in the world sunk into countertops and flooring and every spare moment went into work -- twenty-four hour days of nonstop focus seven days a week to the point of psychosis. It worked.
JFL:
What's the craziest late-night after-hours tattoo time you've ever experienced? And I don't mean like "fun party woohoo" crazy, I mean like "get me the f@#k out of here, what the hell is going on" crazy.
BB:
Mike Demassi, Mike Devries, Sean Herman, Dave Tedder, and I tattooed my apprentice Matt Dunlap from about 4 am-9am after we had spent all day tattooing and drinking heavily at the private studio. The video footage is not only disturbing but also bizarre and horrifying. We want to use it for SEE YOU IN H*LL Vol. 2, but are having trouble editing it into anything remotely politically correct in any way... it was amazing.
JFL:
How has your early behavior affected your career, and how was it trying to turn your image around on a professional level?
BB:
It definitely makes it harder for my peers from back in the day to accept the success we have achieved. I spent many years being "that guy" and did a 180 on everybody with no warning, so people who knew me then and saw what happened spoke out and initially became our first "haters." That led to a bandwagon of disparaging Internet chat and forum commentary that thunders throughout the Internet to this day. It used to bother me a lot, but now we just ignore it and push forward. I try to just keep my head up and not speak out about anyone or any shops, regardless of what they might be saying about ours. Taking the high road, so to speak. To get in a pi$$ing match with the world is futile and time wasted. I try not to waste any time. I don't have much of it.
JFL:
How do you handle the conflict between being balls deep in fun, and also appearing professional enough to not frighten away clients?
BB:
I separate my life in many degrees and levels. The public sees what we approve in film, or photos, or information, and my close friends see an entirely different side of me. My wife sees another entirely separate section of my reality, and so it seems I have spliced my life into sections. An existential crisis of sorts, but a lucrative, functional, and productive melting pot. I hate the "Brandon Bond" that was created by the media in our industry early on and it's still frustrating that people believe all that. The bottom line is that I am who I need to be to generate interest and revenue on certain levels, but I never changed whom I am or sold out in any way. I have turned down multiple TV show offers to ensure that not be tainted. All of the books and films come out of my publishing company, so therefore are not tainted by mainstream influences. My book WHORE is not what would have been produced by a "normal" publishing house. Our film See You in H*LL is definitely not anything like what those reality TV producer-type snakes would have created out of us.

I am the same person, we just chopped up what people do and don't see. I worked to get where I am and did it on my own terms, in my own way. I think many people see that and are disturbed because it reminds them of their own laziness or lack of focus. Many artists out there are much better than I am and are barely scraping by financially. I don't want to be another 60+ year old tattooer. I will still tattoo, but only for fun. My personal life, my spiritual beliefs, my finances, my family are all distinctly intact and immediate; however, there is no reason to involve these realities in my business life.
JFL:
How do you reconcile your own beliefs with possibly offensive (to you personally) subject matter?
BB:
I am not emotionally involved in the imagery I create on a personal level. My involvement is purely aesthetic and artistic. I want to do the best possible piece regardless of meaning and rarely even discuss a piece' relevance with my client. It's the image itself I'm focused on, along with body placement, vibrancy, saturation, color palette, and longevity of the actual tattoo itself. Tattooing is very different from all other mediums of art in that regard. The piece is on someone, therefore you have to listen to them at least a little, at least while they are paying you. Hahahahaaa, then we can just make fun of them and count money.

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EVERYTHING YOU COULD EVER WANT TO KNOW ABOUT NEW THE NEW INK www.freedom2ink.com
I have been their secret consultant for a year!!!!!!!!!!!!!!
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Actually I have been working with that company as a consultant for almost a year, and I have personally tattooed with that ink more than anyone in the world. I work with them at least 3-5 days a week every week. I have tattooed with every single version of the black ink, and will be developing a color palette with them and the geniuses at Brown University this winter. I was the first tattoo artist to work with them so closely and I am a part of their family for sure.

LOTS of tattooers initially were claiming things in the media like "tattoos are sacred, they should be permanent" well I COMPLETELY agree BUT ALL TATTOOS are REMOVABLE, this particular version of tattoo ink just comes out with less trauma, expense and scarring. and the new ink IS PERMANENT!!!!! I think there was a lot of initial skepticism and chaos surrounding Freedom 2 and the idea of an easily removable ink, but like all innovations, that will subside when everyone sees that its the same thing only better.

It is the next evolutionary step in our industry, change leads to growth and tattooing fears change more so than any other industry in the world it seems. It is our traditions and self governing rules that have made us what we are as artists, and I have nothing but respect for all of those who have come before me. Artists like Sailor Jerry, Don Ed Hardy, Mike Malone, Paul Rogers, and one of my own former staff members, Zeke Owen, were all innovators and introduced new concepts and advances in our industry, we should not forget that it is innovations and new ideas that led us to where we are today and will lead us to where we are going to be tomorrow.

The truth is I have endured hundreds of hours of horrible laser sessions, and so has my wife. I got tattooed heavily at a young age, long before I knew what to look for in an artist and a studio, long before the Internet, and the ability to see so many great artists. I DO NOT regret getting tattooed at all - but what I'm saying is... If I could go back magically and get tattoos that are the quality of the artists at ALL OR NOTHING for example, I would do it in a heartbeat. I love my tattoos and I love my bodysuit, but I also love ART and the artwork available today was not available to ANYONE 20 years ago.

I have a upper half sleeve, that was tattooed completely, lasered heavily, lasered some more, experimented with propane and scalpels, home removal techniques, and four different kinds of laser. I then got the scarred area re-tattooed by Eric Merrill, and when the skin didn't accept the ink, we did it again. I have spent over $15, 000.00 on that one section of my body and been through far more suffering than any reasonable person should have to go through. And it still doesn't look right. It's because the ink that was used was SO incredibly hard to remove. Many artists and clients have experienced similar stories, and sometimes the scars are so bad that you cannot RE-TATTOO over it successfully. IF WE CAN AVOID THIS WE SHOULD! Many of the best artists in the world have been through extensive laser, Guy Aitchinson jumps to mind for example. Yes tattoos should be permanent and stand the test of time, but once a client pays for that artwork it becomes THEIRS not OURS as artists, clients can do whatever they want with their own bodies.

To shun freedom 2 is absurd, its like "ohhh we should outlaw COVER UP TATTOOS, cause they should just be STUCK with whatever we do forever" or "we should not listen to what a client even wants to get tattooed". It's crazy. Its their bodies they can do whatever they want and not all artists are equal, lets be honest! I'm guessing about 15% of tattoo shops in the world are amazingly talented and that do award winning, super stylized, highly sought after art. That leaves 85% of either average or below average artists.

Getting tattooed is a journey, and an educational experience for the client. Not all clients are smart enough to start our with a sleeve from a Paul Booth or a Sean Herman. When I got my first tattoo, I thought "if I pick the right one, it will look awesome!" I was wrong, it looked like s&!t. I got tattooed by the guy who gave me the cheapest price and I got a piece of flash that came out all wrong. Hell, I dint even know what FLASH was - I had no concept of a custom piece of art, I had no idea who my artist was or what a portfolios importance was, I didn't even look at it.

I removed the tattoo years later and got on a plane to go get a custom piece from an artist like 8 states away. WHY? Because by then I had learned about what I was getting myself into. Clients aren't born with the innate knowledge it requires to find an artist like Bob Tyrrell nor is a client born with the motivation to travel across the country to get top quality work. Some are maybe, but in my experience VERY FEW are. So if we can give the world an opportunity to remove sub par artwork and replace it with better art at a later date, or remove something that is a painful reminder of a painful time in life or whatever, I say THAT'S WHAT WE SHOULD DO!

My wife is so badly scarred from laser treatments that the tissue is not even tattooable anymore. She got tattooed as a young lady, way before her and I met, now she sees great art everyday and wants that instead of her crappy flash dolphins. It's tragic that even being married to an artist like me, she is still limited in what she can do with her old tattoos.

I believe that this ink will also open our industry to an entirely new demographic, which means more families sustaining off of our art. People who are already heavily tattooed but are not sure about going past the elbow or getting their hands tattooed, or other visible spots. People who want to try out the tattoo world but don't want to have to sit through 13 laser sessions to undo it if their artist is inconsistent or sub par. The "fence sitters" of the universe are about to hop right off that fence and into your chair as an artist. More clients, more art, more money, more pushing the limits of what can be done with our art form. Say what you will, but the minute you charge one dollar for a piece of art it becomes a business, a transaction, a livelihood, an income. The only way to avoid that would be to do tattoos for free everyday forever, and I don't know any artists like that. There will be many more technological, and artistic "jumps" in our lifetime in tattooing, I say if its good for clients, and its good for artists, lets get it on.

Our studio will be one of 10 studios selected nationwide to offer the ink. I chose the studios that will use it initially in order to control the quality of the artwork that is a result. I enlisted the assistance of artists, Bob Tyrrell, Damon Conklin, Tony Ciavarro, Chris Blinston, Poalo, Scott Campbell, Larry Brogan, Shane Oneal, Johnny Jackson, and several other artists who are not only my friends, but guys I respect artistically. All or Nothing Tattoo will be the first exclusive outlet and the only one in Georgia for the next year. Tattoo Supergenuis in Seattle, Tattoo City in Lockport IL, Divinity Tattoo in AZ, Big Brain 2 in FL, Texas Body Arts in TX, and a handful of other will be the only studios offering this ink initially. They are all incredible studios.

as to the inks yes they are more expensive and they come in single serving small packets - it also comes with its own set of rules for use that I, and several other have put together and a special aftercare kit jst for these tattoos (which of course is based in my friends company H20cean) the tattoo itself will cost more as well though... substantially more at first.

the rare occasion comment: ohhh well - millions of people have already registered on the www.freedom2ink.com website - it will not be rare at all. in fact the release of this ink has been and will be the most publicized innovation in our industry to date - CNN, Wall Street Journal, ABC Dateline, Forbes, USA Today - have a far wider reach than "tattoo savage magazine" and reaches a demographic that we as tattoo guys havent yet been able to reach.

I have an interview with TIME magazine coming up and Ive already spoken with ABC news..... Ive been tattooing a long time and achieved a lot and been interviewed so many times that it is no more annoying than it is exciting, and I never spoken to TIME hahahaaaaa

there will be more requests for this than you are thinking bro..... shops all over america have already contacted www.freedom2ink.com trying to get the stuff because their CLIENTS are coming in asking for it already.

Im not saying that this ink is the best thing since sliced bread, Im saying its an interesting innovation and alternative and I want to be involved in growth and sucess, I feel that this is part of the future, I could be wrong, and thats fine, hell, im still going to use "old " inks all the time unless the cleint requests otherwise, just like I still use my electric machines unless the client agrees to let me experiment with pneumas or rotary machines - Im just trying to learn about everything that will push our art and client base to the next level.

and Im also saying that my body has a LOT of crappy tattoos that I wish I could remove in one easy shot!!!! And then get tattooed by an artist like Sean Herman or Dave Tedder! I cant!!! Ive tried and it sucks bad to remove these "old" inks!!!!!!!!!! Im stuck with crap and it blows. Im so jealous of my clients when I see what they walk out of www.antiartatlanta.com its rediculuos - they have way better tattoos than I DO!!!!

first of all ITS NOT SEMI-PERMANENT yo!!! hahahah - its permanant as f@#k!!! its the same to tattoo with also - its TATTOO INK!!! but with a simple laser surgery it breaks up safely and efficiently in one shot!!!! thats awesome !!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

and yes they have tested it and retested in - and STILL ARE!!! no other inks in the world are "medical grade" created by people like this - chemists, phd types, doctors, dermatologists, AND TATTOO ARTISTS!!!!

no inks in the world have been through testing at Brown University and Duke University (except for when these guys worked with contemporary inks to determine how to improve them) - but yeah clinical trials, sun exposure in depth studies, the works -

these guys mean buisness and I have been nothing but IMPRESSED with their attention to detail and THEIR INTEREST IN WORKING WITH ARTISTS on this! they dont have to!!!!

the demand for the ink will be there regardless, but they have spent a LOT of time and money working with me and several other "big name" artists. Everytime I tattoo with it they want DETAILS, photos, and suggestions and they USE EM!!!!!

they could have blown off the artists entirely and just made the demand for the ink take over the artists - instead they have gone through painstaking detail to make sure that WE as ARTISTS are happy with it and comfortable using it.

Bob Tyrrell is about to fly down here to do some tattooing with me for some video footage for s&!t like CNN - ABC - etc -

Shane Oneal is about to do a portrait with it -

Chris Blinston, Johnny Jackson, Poalo, Tony Ciavarro, Scott Campbell, Damon Conklin, all of us are about to do work with this ink and you will be amazed... you cant tell the difference, only as an artist you can CHARGE WAAAAY more money and the client can do whatever they want with their body waaaaay easier - its a win win and a LOT of great artists are on board due to confidentiality aggreements I cannot disclose the entire list - however I can say that it is a collection of the 20 best artists in the world - some public some secret - BUT ALL AMAZING

they didnt have to work with any of us - I suggested it and they respected my suggestion, every single time I have dealt with them (which is just about every day for a year, they have done nothing but treat me with repect - waaaaay more respect than say "technical tattoo" would or "pappillion" hell most supply and manufactoring companies dont even know who I am when I speak to them - because they are not interested in tattoos... just sales - these guys are interested - hell, my main contact there is getting TWO SLEEVES from me - I expected F2 to be a bunch of stuck up rich type doctor megamillion - reatrds - but it is quite the opposite.

they are cool people trying to make it easier and safer to do tattoos - this ink is only one project out of SEVERAL that are coming.... you will be amazed.

most of the clients I tattoo are getting HUGE pieces, many started with a crappy kanji or armbands, they were unsure at first and then Im stuck covering up a million little crappy tattoos to try and make one giant sleeve or backpiece.

"Testing the waters" already happens with most NEW or young clients and if more clients are willing to test the waterrs, more people will go for full sleeves later, more artists will have more clients and there will be exponentially more opportunity for serious artists to push the limits -

more cleints means more art. and hell I would get my wifes name on me IF it was easilly removeable hahahaha - theres a lot of tattoo ideas that will get done because people know they can remove it later if they want??? somebody may want something and change their mind later?? it happens!! hell all the tattoos I "CHOSE" when I was 16-24 were just plain bad choices, bad artists, bad tattoos. Interests change, where do you think COVER UPS COME FROM - we wouldnt have to do cover ups anymore hahahahahaa

it sounds like heaven to me!! I hate coverups but I do em ALL the f@#king time - it sucks! hahahaaaa

ps - a little known fact - almost every single tattoo in my gallery is a cover up.

we dont show before and after pictures because I DONT WANT TO ENCOURAGE people to get cover ups from ME hahahaa - I hate em!! but in order to do exclusively large pieces year round, you are inevitably going to be stuck doing coverups somewhere in the design at least 80% of the time.

its constant and serious and I would rather have blank skin 100% of the time if I could choose - wouldnt you?

Q...) I'm kind of stuck in the middle on this. You make some pretty convincing arguments but how do we know how this stuff behaves over the long run?



A...) we dont ever know what a new ink will do - the new karasumi colors for example??? all inks come out blind at some point so yeah Im concerned everytime I try a new ink for sure... but all the tests and sunlight exposure light treatments by these medical type folks - show that it lasts equal to or greater than contemporary inks on the market today

Q...) Don't you think it would be unethical to just start using something without being sure of it's longevity.

A...) yeah I DO - but we do it all the time - we have to as tattoo artists - we dont know what a NEW type ink will look like in a billion years ever - the only way to tell is to wait for a billion years ya know???

example... I just tried those new austrailian colors and they are so bright they have to be radioactive or something hahahah - and they were NOT created by doctors and phd types.... i think this new ink would be safer than that????

Q...) Old-timers like Sailor Jerry and Hardy etc. didn't have the luxury that we enjoy of knowing what happens to colors over a long period. Those guys did all of the experimenting and left us a trade that was pretty much figured out.
And another thing- What happens to those shells after they get lasered? The website makes it sound like they break open and then stay in the skin. Just the pigment gets carried away.


the polymer beads break down with as well is my understanding and is safely absobed by the body unlike contemporary inks that release all kinds of wierd chemicals into the liver and kidneys and everywhere when its zapped by a laser.


I have seen tattoos done with this stuff removed and they do come out in one shot with a specific laser. I have seen the healed removed areas flawlessly unscarred - whereas my OWN tattoos on my body when removed left terrible scars....

ps dont forget ALL INKS ARE REMOVABLE its just a question of how much crap you want to have to put people through to remove it.

My tattoos on my body are removable yes, but its hurts way to much and takes way too long and costs waay to much for me to bother messing with them - so Im stuck with crappy work even though I OWN one of the best tattoo studios in the world and can get tattooed there for free everyday!!!!

thats the ironic thing isnt it - hell yeah I wish I could remove them easier!
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EVERYTHING ABOUT FILMING LA INK WITH KAT VON D
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On the TLC show L.A. INK, Pixie, the shop manager needs a surgery. LA INK is already the highest rated show in TLC history. Brandon Bond, owner the All or Nothing Tattoo empire in Atlanta and two time "tattoo artist of the year" was invited out to help with raising money for Pixie's surgery. Brandon and the LA INK crew threw a huge fundraising party together, after Brandon flew out with several hundred pounds of merchandise to donate from his publishing company, STRANGLEHOLD PUBLICATIONS. His award winning tattoo documentary, "SEE YOU IN HELL", and his book "WHORE" along with all of his published sketchbooks and childrens coloring books (all available on www.strangleholdmerch.com) accompanied his new line of t-shirts from WWW.HARDNOXINC.COM and other tattoo related projects and were donated to the cause. The party was a huge success, and Pixie got her surgery, for free as a result of the party. Many of Kat Von D's Friends and local businesses in LA also donated a huge array of crazy items which were raffled and auctioned. Many gallons of alcohol were consumed, and debauchery followed. All excess proceeds were given to Pit Bull Rescue Charities, as that is something both Brandon Bond and Pixie are extremely interested and involved in.

Brian Rowland... aka "Darth Vader backpiece guy" accompanied Brandon on the trip out, the two rented a black on black Hummer, "Hollywood style" and had a blast terrorizing LA for a 4 day weekend. When asked about the controversy surrounding the show and how the tattoo community seems to be fighting this growth and exposure Brandon replied; "The environment in which the artists on that show are filming is incredibly gruelling and demanding", says Brandon, "It's really amazing that they can produce that level of art under those circumstances. I have never even sat through an episode of "Miami Ink", or "Inked", to be honest the commercials alone made me sick. But when I watched the season premiere of LA INK, I knew that the level of art was obviously higher than that of the other shows, the artists are respected, well known, established bada$$es and I saw it as an interesting and fun adventure to participate in." "They told me that Nikko had just stopped in to tattoo Kat Von D and that Aaron Cain and Guy Aitchinson were scheduled to make a potential appearance if possible as well. These are also artists that I greatly respect and that have influenced my work for many years. When approached about it I could not resist the opportunity to show up for a big party and raise money for a great cause. We support our family of artists with blinding intensity and it was great to help two families join together to achieve something beautiful together.".
"My studio actually turned down a couple of offers to film some television shows in our studio, and now I am REALLY glad I rejected it. The process was horrifying and stressful, and I enjoy that our studios here in Atlanta are relaxing and comfortable. I have no interest in turning my private life into a weekly censored boob tube event, yet I am fascinated by these artists ability to produce such great art under those circumstances. I have known and respected Hannah Aitchison for many years, and consider her an amazing and influential artist and a friend." People can say whatever they want about how TV shows will ruin the secret underworld and integrity of tattooing and I have to admit that I have many mixed feelings about it myself, but these folks do great tattoos and have a great time doing it. Brian and I had a blast out there. I don't regret it a bit, and everyone involved was incredibly accommodating and respectful".
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Due to his artistic abilities and machine-like self promotion, brandon Bond has had more than his share of exposure and magazine coverage. He has built bridges and burned bridges. He has made fans and friends within the industry, as well as gained a few haters. This article is the be all and end all. according to Brandon, this will be his last interview. He is also announcing his retirement and new ventures. So hate not haters and fear not loyal fans, your questions and comments have been heard and Brandon is here to set the record straight.

Did you see yourself becoming the artist and businessman that you are today back when you started tattooing?

When I started tattooing I was not even aware of the intensity and growth we were all about to experience as an art form, lifestyle, and as a business. The tattoo industry has since gone through a huge rebirth and renaissance and my plans were created on the fly as a result of that growth. Fourteen years ago, there really wasn't anything around like what we are doing today. It was later that 222 Tattoo in Frisco, Darkside Tattoo in Connecticut, Ed Hardy's Tattoo City, and NewSkool Kolectiv in Cali all shaped what people thought about the limitations of the parlor atmosphere. I knew that I was going to do everything in my power to learn and grow and develop my own style, but as I saw artists working together and accomplishing works that consistently blew everyone�s minds, I knew that collaboration was the future of tattooing. One artist alone cannot produce art like two or five or ten artists can. Strength is in numbers, but I never forget that it is always quality over quantity. One bad attitude or ego driven distraction can ruin the mood and art is all about mood. I worked in 20 cities at a vast number of extremely well known studios. I had U-Haul on speed dial for over a decade. I moved nomadically seeking better art, better artistic environments, and was consistently disappointed. I knew at some point that I would have to create what I was seeking and set out to make it happen at any cost. I feel extremely grateful to have pulled together the staff and environment that continues to grow here in Atlanta at our studio. I put everything I had into it and fought tooth and nail to ensure its success. It was worth it.



Your tattoo studio, All Or Nothing, just celebrated its second anniversary, and it's been one of the most publicized shops in the last few years. Did you have any idea how successful your shop was going to become?

Honestly, we have only achieved about 70 percent of the goals I have in place. But we are still young. I thought it would work, but the level of success we have achieved, and are still achieving, is only the result of hard work with a side dish of luck. My staff and I push each other at every pass, I could not have achieved any of this alone, and I remind them of that as often as possible. As amazing and awesome of a ride as this has been, there is much work still to do. "The only place success comes before work is in the dictionary." That is a quote in my book from my mother, and it's true. We have to remain hungry at all times, motivated and driven.

Your shop name pretty well sums up the type of person you are. You are all or nothing when it comes to art and shop promotion. What have been some of the triumphs and speed bumps that have helped or hindered you in your rise to fame and fortune?

Tattooing is an art form, studio ownership is a business. I think a lot of people blur the line between the two. I refuse to let my staff starve. The only purpose in business is producing revenue and feeding those who depend on it. I feel like a lot of people misunderstood what I was doing early on, and as a result we still have a lot of haters. The "starving artist" mentality that pervades our industry is doing nothing but holding us back. I was simply reaching out to our target demographic as a means to an end. Internet promotion and advertising are key to any successful venture economically. So I hired some people to plaster search engine friendly information all over the Internet. Tattoo artists have consistently misunderstood this activity and still do in some instances. If we win a pile of awards and then post it on the Internet we are not being arrogant, cocky, exploitative, or obnoxious; we are simply feeding information to our target demographic: the tattoo client. Why do we need 15 Web sites? Because clients read every single word on all of them and then book a flight to Atlanta. Why have a mailing list? So our clients can be aware of what's going on and which cities we will be appearing in. Why advertise on TV? Why not? Tattooing is no longer a secret, underbelly of negativity. It is a validated art form and a gigantic industry enjoying a level of success that was previously unprecedented. We treated our studio as a business and promoted it. I am not interested in being underground or secretive, this is not the '20s and I see no reason to act like it is. Would I have changed anything? Yes! I probably would have added a disclaimer specifically directed at other tattoo artists saying, "Relax, man. It's cool. This is just for the clients of the universe. Please don't hate the player, hate the game. We are not trying to say we are better than you. We are promoting, so please ignore this unless you want to get a really dope tattoo."



You recently started Stranglehold Publications and merchandise. What's available through Stranglehold?

The Web site (www.strangleholdmerch.com) is a collection of books, shirts, tattoo chairs, original paintings, sketchbooks, framed signed prints, tattoo equipment, armrests, stickers, huge mag tubes, collaboration tables, and other high-quality, high-end tattoo type s&!t. It is really exciting because the stuff we're moving is top of the line. We could not find the equipment we needed to do all the crazy stuff we're doing, so we started building it.

What's the best way to describe your new book Whore, and why was it something that you wanted to put together?

I was approached about doing a book two years ago. A company asked me to send them some drawings and photos, and then they would do the rest. I blew them off, knowing that anything I put together would have to be completely controlled by my graphics team and uncensored. Their offer inspired me and I began a journey to create something extremely personal, powerful, motivating, artistic, and f@#ked up. It took us two years of working everyday on it. Every page is a piece of art, an uncomfortable window into an extremely disturbing and blunt reality. I address every aspect of tattooing, sexuality, relationships, promotion, exposure, motivation, money, frustration, being a boss, hatred, love, despair, and success. I touched on every subject that we could force into the 170 plus pages. There is text, photos, drawings, blood splatter, firearms, nudity, money, short stories, and deeply personal messages exploding throughout the book. It's pretty insane and every word is completely honest in every way. In fact, it's too honest at times.



You recently announced your retirement. Are we still going to see new Brandon Bond tattoos?

Yes, I am still tattooing. The honest truth is that I couldn't handle the amount of clients flooding my appointment book. We have booked the rest of the year, and we aren't taking many new clients. I am not all art fagged out, or trying to dissuade any potential clients, however I'm dying from way too many hours of tattooing. I worked seven days a week for over a decade, literally. This is actually a large part of what my book is about. I haven't done anything but tattoo since I was 17 years old, and I need room to breathe. Still, I don't know anything other than tattooing. It is my life. I'm not abandoning it, just backing up off of it. I will no longer be tattooing at conventions, doing guest spots, no more crazy tour schedules, and hopefully things will not be so hectic in my everyday life. I will still be teaching in convention seminars, but not trying to tattoo my ass off.

Tell me about your new studio, A.N.T.I. Art Elite.

I wanted to be able to tattoo in an environment that I could not be distracted in, an area where we could do collaborations without interruption. This studio I have built is incredible, complete with movie theaters, Koi fishponds, huge drawing areas, an art gallery featuring my own private collection of works from all over, and the most laid back luxurious setting imaginable. Clients cannot get tattooed here without approval. It is not a public studio. It is perfect in every way. It relaxes both the client and the artists to the point of bliss. The days and nights pass as though I weren't even working at times. It made tattooing fun again for me. It's opulent.

When a client comes to you and says, "Do whatever you want," how do you decide what to tattoo on them?

I'm extremely fortunate to have the clients I do. Most of them pick a body part and say, "Fill it up." This freedom allows for an incredible level of consistent experimentation and motivation. I keep a heavy black file folder with me at all times that contains hundreds of sketches, photos, images, disks, and tattoo ideas. I work to overflow this folder constantly. On the day of a client�s appointment, I just lay out a few printouts and drawings that fit the body part, and explain what direction I'm pushing towards. From this the client selects the style or imagery he or she is most enthusiastic about. I stay up late into the night regularly, researching, drawing, screwing around with Photoshop, and printing all types of images that intimidate my artistic confidence. I look to do tattoos that are extremely hard to do. Clients really dig going through all the secret files, and sometimes they argue over who gets what, but nothing is wasted. I discuss a lot of this process and how to emulate it in my seminars.


Where has the world of collaborative tattooing taken you artistically in the last year?

Further than I could have ever gone on my own in another 15 careers of workaholism. I learn from every collaboration we do. It is the absolute height of art and growth. The way I look at tattoos is affected by challenging myself to work with another artist who I respect. It's nerve racking, intense, and occasionally uncomfortable, but it creates change and anyone who fears change in their portfolio is not growing at all. Tattooing with another artist's favorite ink or machines, and using different lighting and colors in the imagery is like a window into another artist's secret creative process with an all access pass, VIP style. My back piece is a collaborative work, and my new studio is set up specifically for doing collaborations. I cannot explain the magic that happens to your vision by doing this with someone you can be yourself with. My work changes slightly with every artist I work with and I can always see the reciprocal occurrences in the other artists corresponding portfolios. It's like setting your creative gasoline on fire and drenching it in truckloads of gunpowder. Albie Rock, Dave Tedder, Nate Beavers, Sean Herman, Josh Woods, Lenny Renken, Joe Waulken, and Joshua Carlton have all had an influence on what I do as a result of hours and hours of intensive focused debate while creating mutual works of art together. I will continue to work in this manner regardless. It's so personal and beautiful. It's confident and scary all at the same time. I'm all tingly just thinking about it. Your gonna make me all misty and stuff man...

In becoming who you are as an artist and shop owner, you built a lot of bridges and burned a few. Is there anything that you would do different or take back if you had to do it all over again?

It's weird because I have no regrets, but you can't please everyone. I have been repeatedly misquoted in articles, and people take that stuff so personally. In all honesty I would probably take it personally, too! It's extremely upsetting to everyone involved, especially me! I never meant to intentionally offend or disrespect anyone, but it's bound to happen when you're doing as many interviews per year as I have done in the past five [years]. A couple are going to suck. I am not responsible for what a magazine misrepresents, and I always require a retraction acknowledgment. I hope this is not one of them, as it is very important to me that I not offend other tattoo artists. I have nothing but respect for other artists, especially those who have been in it longer than I. My gratitude is expressed constantly in my work and in print, but that's not the part people seem to notice. It's ironic really, for instance, when your talking to your old lady and you tell her for five minutes how awesome she is, but all she heard was one sentence in the middle somewhere that offended her. Then, of course, she freaks out and doesn't give you any coochie. I have nothing but respect for tattooing, tattoo artists, and tattoo studios. Without those before us, we would be nothing. People seem to have formulated an opinion about me because of all the crap in these interviews. My book deals with this subject some as well. All I can say is, "Don't believe the hype." If you are offended by my statements, call me, let's talk about it. Don't freak out and talk s&!t about who I am as a person. I'm easy to find, and a magazine is not a venue in which I would start a war.

You just imported a team of great new artists. Who are these guys and where did you find them?

I honestly could not be more stoked about the talent that just moved in. Dave Tedder and I toured last year all over the country doing conventions, seminars and guest spots. We met hundreds of badass tattoo artists from everywhere, and word traveled that we were looking for some like-minded, driven and talented artists. The first was Nate Beavers from Big Brain in Omaha. He came to our shop to do a few guest spots and just blew everyone�s f@#king mind. That guy is on fire. I have already done two collaborations with him, and I have to try to keep up with him. He has been tattooing as long as I have, I think. He's incredible. He can bust out a portrait, a bloody zombie, perfect traditional, and a Japanese sleeve all in the same afternoon without batting an eye. The second was Josh Woodkowski (Josh Woods) from Buffalo, New York. I cannot believe the s&!t this guy pulls off. He does so many different styles at the same time I don't think he even understands it! Watch out for that guy, he's burning both ends. The third was Lenny Renken who also comes from Omaha. He is a younger artist who you will soon get tired of being blown away by. We are doing a collaboration piece together in a few weeks. He is growing faster than all of us. These guys with Dave Tedder, Sean Herman, Joe Waulken, a slew of guest artists, and myself combine to form Voltron, and can really destroy some s&!t. We are always looking to find more hungry and driven talent, and are always hiring. Albie Rock, Justin Weatherholtz, Billy Hill, Dan Henk, and Anthony Orsatti come through regularly and lay the smack down. We are a Leviathan of motivation and creativity, I have to pinch myself to make sure I'm not just hallucinating all of this.

Any final thoughts, future goals or shout outs?

Yes, we have a new addition to the A.N.T.I. family. Dave Tedder is about to reproduce any day now and All Or Nothing has never had a baby! So congrats to Dave and his baby mama. And I�ll see all of you in hell.
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all about SEE YOU IN HELL the documentary!!!
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recently received the phenomenal new documentary entitled "See You In Hell", and we were absolutely blown away by the film. This is nothing like what we saw in the barrage of "shock" style previews. We highly recommend that you pick up a copy of this project.

A blistering personal journey into the explosive career, and hilarious lifestyle of one of the worlds most notorious tattoo artists and his clan of award winning co-workers. "See You In Hell" is a 2 hour window into a secret reality, that is absolutely NOTHING like any project produced about the cultural phenomenon and widespread success of the tattoo industry.


This documentary is a comprehensive, in your face, look into the creation of the worlds most published and award winning tattoo studio, "All or Nothing Tattoo" in Atlanta, GA, and the empire of art and workaholism surrounding Brandon Bond (voted tattoo artist if the year 2005, and 2006). The film, starring Bond and his huge family of gifted artists and lunatics, takes the viewer on a fast paced whirlwind, 17 city tour of tattoo conventions across America focusing on the artists that set the standard for excess and artwork at every turn, and then back home to a thriving leviathan of success and chaos. The directing constantly bombards the senses with random and awe inspiring situations, emotions, and incredible tattoo artistry.

"See You In Hell" is a one of a kind project that stands on its own as a force to be reckoned with. Random acts of wanton debauchery, tear gas, pit bulls, hilarious parties, firearms, tattoo art creation, slews of clients flying in from foreign countries, fireworks, and piles of money everywhere, COLLIDE with touching scenes of gratitude, love, and motivation as Brandon Bond guides his army into unprecedented levels of artistic success and personal growth. Never giving in, never accepting discouragement or failure, and living for the moment with those closest to you are reoccurring themes throughout the film giving a warm, compassionate and positively uplifting feel to the feature.

The entire film is set to a thunderous and official soundtrack from Eulogy Recordings (also entitled "See You In Hell'). The actual soundtrack will be released July 4, 2007 worldwide. The bands featured are some of the most widely sought after and nationally headlining Hard-Core bands in the industry. This is a film that should definitely be viewed at high volume, as scores of bands from the Eulogy Library crush through almost every scene adding to the overall intensity of the "All Or Nothing" lifestyle. When asked about the musical selection Brandon Bond stated: "Its my favorite record label, all my favorite bands are on that label, and the owner is a good friend of mine, so the decision to use ONLY their music was an easy one. The CD coming out is going to be amazing."



"See You In Hell" also forces its way into the opulent and hidden studio called A.N.T.I. Art Elite, which is a never before seen, lush tattoo studio that hosts 2 movie theaters, several koi fish and turtle ponds, waterfalls, and luxury dripping in lavish architecture and sophistication. Despite owning multiple tattoo studios, this is the only one that Brandon Bond actually tattoos in for obvious reasons. Huge artworks are created right in front of the camera, and then are followed to tattoo conventions where they consistently win every award for every artistic category they are entered into.

Brandon Bond is both hated and loved by swarming masses of tattoo enthusiasts and artists all over the world. He is an artist who found success on his own terms and in his own way, without compromising who he is and without being arrogant or lazy in any way. Surprisingly, Bond is not pompous or elitist at all, even in light of his overwhelming accomplishments, he maintains his sharp wit and biting sense of humor throughout. Brandon is surprisingly humble and extremely likeable contrary to his unfounded reputation of arrogance, indifference, and greed. He is confident, loving, giving, and only "slightly cocky" as described in the film by his own apprentice (John Lloyd): "He's like Mohammad Ali in the way that he talks a lot of sh*t but can totally back it up".

The Film also focuses consistently on the importance of "family"; as Bond's staff of over 50 people is described as "equal extensions of the same force". The loyalty and compassion that the family shares for each other is spellbinding. Brandon is incredibly motivating, protective, loyal, loving, and patient with his crew of co-workers and friends; forming an unstoppable force of self perpetuating success.

Surprisingly, the film is interrupted with a barrage of extremely provocative and personal footage of Brandon's home life, his mother, his wife, his dogs, his travels, and a real shootout with the Atlanta S.W.A.T . police force. Much of this footage seems to have been filmed by Brandon himslef with a home movie camera. There are tear gassed soaked scenes of gun play, live hostage situations, and hilarious shots of police K9 training for Bond's family of rescued pit-bulls; all overlapping scenes of his book release party and a television show flying him to LA, interrupting a slew of touring tattoo conventions and compulsive workaholism. There is so much happening all the time with these artists that you will be exhausted when you finally reach the end.

The supporting characters in the film, his eclectic staff members, clients, and friends are featured throughout. His artists and clients are shown with splashes of featured articles and portfolio pictures of their artworks and accomplishments. These outlandish and mildly insane "motley crew" give the film a continuous surge of fresh faces and captivating surprises. This is not a film about tattooing, nor is it a film about Brandon Bond. This feature is a project that focuses on the "family" of All or Nothing, and finally gives outsiders a real "reality" based viewing experience into "real life" tattooers having a "real life". This is not scripted, predictable, or boring in any way. Since receiving the DVD, I have already watched it 3 times.

If you are expecting "Miami Ink", or "Inked" from recent TV shows, you are not going to enjoy this movie. It is raw, uncensored, belligerent, and intense. However if you have any interest in just about anything pertaining to art, success, tattoos, money, firearms, law enforcement, friendship, humor, or personal motivation, this is a film you NEED to see. Brandon Bond will remind you of everything you haven't gotten done and after you stop resenting him for it, you will immediately begin to work harder at whatever you do.
This is an incredible movie, 5 stars all the way, and www.strangleholdmerch.com tells us that Volume 2, the sequel, will be available before Christmas 07! A two- disk DVD set and a two-disk CD soundtrack from Eulogy Recordings not for the kiddies stockings (unless you have REALLY grown up kids).

The film is set for mainstream distribution this summer, but www.strangleholdmerch.com is offering limited edition copies of it for only 20$ online NOW!

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all about the WHOLE ENCHILADA the seminar DVD
_________________________________________

"The Whole Enchilada" is an incredible collection of motivational and professional information directly pertaining to all levels of a Tattoo Artist's Career. This DVD is being released by Brandon Bond and his Publishing Company STRANGLEHOLD PUBLICATIONS, and will be made available ONLY to professional Tattoo artists. After an artist purchases the DVD ONLY through www.strangleholdmerch.com the purchaser will be contacted directly by the Stranglehold Staff for various forms of confirmation options. We will make it extremely EASY for anyone involved in the Tattoo Industry to purchase the dvd, if you have a buisness liscence or a yellow pages ad or a website, or an inked nation acct or myspace acct or tattooartists.org acct - our staff will look at those pages to determine if you are ready to purchase. If confirmation is not possible, the purchaser will be refunded. You have to purchase the DVD FIRST to make it worth our time and effort but we WANT to send it to you so relax, we will make it as easy as possible. This 2 hour+ film is in NO WAY meant to REPLACE an apprenticeship!!! All aspects of sterilization and cross contamination must be covered prior to viewing this DVD.

This will light a fire under the ass of even the laziest of all tattoo guys, and gives you a window into the growth and techniques of ALL OR NOTHING and Brandon Bond. It covers everything about stencil layout, illustration vs realism, tattooing, time management, focus, promotion, running a crew, attracting great artists to your shop, dealing with the customers, convention booth acquisition, and career growth. This is a career changing film, from a man that has succeeded on his own terms, and explains in vivid detail exactly how it can happen for anyone who is willing to put fourth the effort.
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  #2  
Old 11-08-2007, 01:34 AM
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

So many of your interviews are great.. I can't ever decide which one I like the best..
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Old 11-08-2007, 03:58 AM
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resonanteye resonanteye is offline
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

now son, you now your mother and I love you very much, but I'm not too sure about all this "removable" ink stuff you've been getting into. So if you ever need to talk, or your friends pressure you into doing things you may not be sure about, I want you to know you can always come to me and your mother for the best advice.

off to bed now, skipper.
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Old 11-08-2007, 08:44 PM
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

ohh yeah you no likey the inkey?
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  #5  
Old 11-11-2007, 10:07 AM
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resonanteye resonanteye is offline
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

not sure about it yet. also I don't want people to treat tattoos as something they can take on and off at will, since the process of removal is very expensive and somewhat painful. it may give them higher expectations than they should have.

plus, I like to imagine that everything I do on skin is permanent. if you think you are going to have to take it off, for f@#k's sake buy a tshirt not a tattoo... I'm just more focussed on educating customers to start out getting good work, than trying to encourage them to get "easily removed" "trial" tattoos...

not that the inks suck, dcan't say, haven't used them. just you know how people are, the way they are being presetned will give a lot of regular folks the absolutely wrong idea
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  #6  
Old 11-12-2007, 11:13 PM
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BRANDON BOND BRANDON BOND is offline
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qpMXUUweMd8

dedicated to bean.
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  #7  
Old 11-13-2007, 09:15 PM
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resonanteye resonanteye is offline
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

Quote:
Originally Posted by BRANDON BOND View Post

*wipes little tear from eye

dammit, don't derail me with luv! hahahaha
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Old 11-27-2007, 01:12 PM
Ghostphase310 Ghostphase310 is offline
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

Thanks for the info!
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  #9  
Old 12-10-2007, 12:41 PM
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

right on! thanks for reading it!


from myspace:


HEY GUYS,JUST GOT THE DVD THE WHOLE ENCHILADA, WHICH REALLY FED MY MIND AND OPENED MY EYES, TO GIVE MY EXISTING STYLE SOME TECHNIQUES THAT ARE REALLY HELPFULL IN THE WAY I USE THE COLOR AND BLACK, LOOKING FOWARD TO SENDING YOU SOME PICS OF WHAT I KNOW WILL BE A BIG DIFFERRENCE IN THE WAY I APPROACH THE TATTOO NOW.
THANKS GUYS
ROBERT ADAMS
RATT A TATT TATT
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  #10  
Old 03-25-2008, 04:55 PM
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Default Re: the longest collection of typing ever....

were about to add the newest interview... stay tuned for an upcoming Skin Deep Article. (UK)
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